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Monday, 19 August 2019 00:00

Your circulation system is responsible for sending blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. The most common causes of poor circulation are obesity, diabetes, heart conditions and arterial issues. Symptoms of poor circulation include tingling, numbness, pain and muscle cramps. Blood clots and varicose veins are two internal issues that lead to poor circulation. Blood clots block the flow of blood either partially or entirely. If discovered too late, blood clots can prove to be deadly, as they can lead to stroke and even death in severe cases. Varicose veins are enlarged veins caused by valve failure. This causes the veins to be unable to move blood as efficiently which will make it very hard for the blood to circulate. Luckily, there are some ways that poor circulation can be treated and diagnosed. It can be diagnosed through a physical exam, blood sugar test for diabetes, ultrasound or CT scan, blood pressure test or antibody blood test. Some treatments include compression socks for painful, swollen feet and ankles, special exercise programs to increase circulation, medications such as blood thinners, and different clot-dissolving drugs. It is recommended to go see your podiatrist if you are experiencing any of the symptoms or have a condition that is known to be associated with poor circulation.


 

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Thursday, 15 August 2019 00:00

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment. 

Monday, 12 August 2019 00:00

People who participate in sporting activities may experience Achilles tendon injuries. If it is torn, surgery may be necessary to repair the tendon, and a lengthy recovery period is often needed. The Achilles tendon is located in the back of the calf, and its purpose is to connect the heel to the calf muscles. It may become injured if sudden jumping or sprinting is performed. This may occur if certain sports are played that can include volleyball and basketball. There are existing conditions which could weaken the Achilles tendon. These can consist of diabetes, specific forms of arthritis that can include gout, or if certain medications are taken. The symptoms that are often associated with this condition can include difficulty in walking, and there may be severe pain while attempting to point and flex the foot. If you have endured an Achilles tendon injury, it is advised to speak with a podiatrist who can guide you toward the proper treatment.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 05 August 2019 00:00

A sesamoid is a bone that is embedded in a tendon. They are found in several joints in the body. In the foot, they are located in the ball, just beneath the joint of the big toe. The sesamoid bone absorbs all of the weight put on the ball of the foot when walking, running and jumping. People with high arches and frequent wearers of high heels are at an increased risk for developing sesamoid problems. Injuries to this bone stem from activities requiring increased pressure on the ball of the foot. There are different types of sesamoid injuries that can occur such as turf toe, fracture of the bone and sesamoiditis, which is an overuse injury. Nonsurgical treatments for these sesamoid injuries include physical therapy, steroid injections, custom orthotics and oral medications such as ibuprofen to help relieve pain and inflammation. Surgery is only required if the sesamoid injuries fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment. If you are dealing with a sesamoid injury, it is encouraged to see a podiatrist for the best treatment option.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Dr. Lee R. Stein of Lake Shore Foot & Ankle, PC. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Chicago, Highland Park, and Uptown, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
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